Added by on 2020-10-18

[Total: 0   Average: 0/5]You must sign in to vote In the third video in our series on Drip Irrigation, we show you several ways you can attach 1/4″ “Spaghetti” tubing to your main irrigation line using barbed emitters and connectors. Check out our other videos on drip irrigation below! https://www.southwestvictorygardens.com/s/Irrigation-Parts-List.pdf Drip Irrigation Components: https://youtu.be/-G5abcgCNYo Poly Tube and “Spaghetti” Tube: https://youtu.be/F4q37Sjn_Ac Dripperline, Drip Tape, and Soaker Hoses: https://youtu.be/Jrie4pImlSM How to Install a Hose Bibb Timer: https://youtu.be/XKCy4Bme39c How to Install Dripperline to Raised Beds: https://youtu.be/UFf5vSM6fWA How to Use Dripperline to Water Container Gardens: https://youtu.be/8hhuE3nZWQE

3 Comments

  • Jose Lopez 1 week ago

    what if you needed to connect multiple emitters to one 1/4 inch pipe. I see you have a t-spit barbed connector. Basically i want to run one 1/4 inch line to one shrub but have two emitters instead of running two separate lines. would you run the 1/4 inch line all the way, split it with the barbed wire, add some more 1/4 inch line, and then attach the emitters at that point and then another 1/4 inch line from the emitter to the plant?

  • Big Bawls 1 week ago

    Very informative and well done. Thanks for the help.

  • John Lowther 1 week ago

    Thanks for the video, appreciate the southwest specific channel content, I’m also located in Tucson working on your style soil building. However I disagree on it being the wrong way to put the emitter at the micro tube end. It’s much less disruptive to change the value of an emitter, troubleshoot an issue, flush a flag end emitter vs digging back to the trunk line to locate the plugged or defective emitter. If it’s an exposed trunk line, for sure putting the emitter is the way to go. If it’s buried line, your mileage may vary.

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