Added by on 2019-12-25

[Total: 0   Average: 0/5] In the interest of water conservation during the historic California drought, we had our traditional lawn removed and opted for a native alternative. We installed native bent grass this spring. Here is an honest update of where we are and what might expect from a native bentgrass lawn alternative. Website: http://www.suburbanstoneage.com/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/SuburbanStoneAge Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SuburbanStoneAge Twitter: https://twitter.com/SuburbanStonAge Pinterest:https://www.pinterest.com/suburbanstonage/ Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/user/SuburbanStoneAge Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/SuburbanStoneAge Paypal Donate: https://www.paypal.me/suburbanstoneage/1 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/suburbanstoneage/ Video Rating: / 5

4 Comments

  • roy kwak 6 months ago

    Thanks for the important post. Any updates on the lawn?

  • Fausto Rios 6 months ago

    Any updates?

  • Braden Van Aert 6 months ago

    This kind of problem could either be lack of sunlight or possibly too much heat if in a transition zone

  • Alfonso Dag 6 months ago

    The instructions for native bentgrass seem to indicate that it can help to conserve water by using half as much water to maintain a green appearance as a bluegrass or fescue grass might require. So since a normal lawn might require about an inch of water per week, the bentgrass would use about 1/2 inch per week. Otherwise it will look like the grass in the video, which is sad. Hopefully, the bentgrass had time to establish some sort of root penetration before going dormant because the the line between dormancy and death is pretty thin.

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