Added by on 2013-04-03

[Total: 0    Average: 0/5] You must sign in to vote Mel Bartholomew answers the most frequently asked question about Square Foot Gardening. With Patti Moreno the Garden Girl.

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24 Comments

  • Al Gracian 5 years ago

    “Pressure treated wood contains chemicals and we don’t want that seeping into our vegetables.”

    Your logic is Chemical = BAD. What “chemicals” are you? referring to? Water is a chemical.

    Pressure Treated lumber for consumers has not had Arsenic since 2004. These days it is ACQ – Alkaline Copper Quat. The old [BAD]? kind was Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA).

    Please get your facts straight & stop spreading baseless fear.

  • Al Gracian 5 years ago

    Pressure Treated lumber for consumers does not even have arsenic in it anymore! These days (since 2004) it is ACQ – Alkaline Copper Quat. The old [BAD] kind was chromated copper arsenate? (CCA). >This video is a joke<

  • nonubusiness 5 years ago

    For people, like me, who? find this video here is a link to a study over the differences of using peat moss or coconut coir.
    usu.edu/cpl/research_coconutcoir.htm

  • OrganicTexas 5 years ago

    You could use newspaper as it’ll degrade with time, but it won’t provide weed blockage. The best thing to do is solarize the ground prior. Once the raise garden is setup, you’ll always have other vectors for? weeds from above.

  • Thesmalltowngardener 5 years ago

    what? about newspaper on the botton of the beds

  • dayspeace 5 years ago

    this is? nice and very helpful.

  • lheartlondon 5 years ago

    no it does? not. don’t lie to make friends.

  • Kenneth G 5 years ago

    Instead of deck screws, I made half-lap joints at the ends of all the boards and they simply fit together. This makes them easy to take apart. I did it with a table saw, but you could use a plain old wood saw and then hammer and chisel to break out the half-lap piece. I tried screwing the corners together, but over a couple? seasons, the corners start to fall apart. thanks, ~aubie

  • shell81d 5 years ago

    I wouldn’t worry about it. Several studies have been? done in the last few years showing that nominal amounts of arsenic actually ends up in the soil and is well below levels of any danger. North Carolina State University has a webpage with their findings. A Misouri extension office suggests lining the wood with heavy plastic if you are worried about chemicals leaking in from rail road ties which can be much more toxic. You could always call your extension office for advice too.

  • shell81d 5 years ago

    I wouldn’t worry about it. Several studies have been done in the last few years showing that nominal amounts of arsenic actually ends up in the soil and is well below levels of any danger. North Carolina State University has a webpage with their findings. A Misouri extension office suggests lining the wood with heavy plastic if you are worried about chemicals leaking in from rail road ties which can be much more toxic. You could? always call your extension office for advice too

  • shell81d 5 years ago

    I wouldn’t worry about it. Several studies have been done in the last few years showing that nominal amounts of arsenic actually ends up in the soil and is well below levels of any danger. North Carolina State University has a webpage with their findings. A Misouri extension office suggests lining the wood with heavy plastic if you are worried about chemicals leaking in from rail road ties which can be much more toxic. You could always call? your extension office for advice too.

  • MICHEYGEE01 5 years ago

    HELP!!…I spent alot on pressure treated wood and I can’t take it back…is there something I can use to cover the sides of the box, so that the? chemicals won’t leak into my garden??

  • GetDamage 5 years ago

    With this technique,? do we ever have to dig the soil up and add more nutrients and stuff?

  • squillyb7718 5 years ago

    I’ll have to make some for ya. NFT and hydro systems in general are actually great for novice growers. Many nutrient mixes are now either one or two part mix’s so not complicated at all. Less work than making? a margarita. Vertical growing becoming more and more popular in urban areas. IA novice grower that can maintain a SFG can easily maintain the equivalent hydro system. I also use several Gericke systems that are organoponics set ups. Using best of both worlds.

  • OrganicTexas 5 years ago

    Well, in your circumstance? yes, but as a general rule (which always has exceptions), deeper roots make for a healthy plant. A NFT is probably beyond the scope of newbie gardeners new to SFG. Your setup sounds pretty spiffy. Do you have any videos of your setup?

  • squillyb7718 5 years ago

    (part 2) and the are very shallow, 2 ” less than what he recommends here. I am also? an outdoor organic grower and have several raised beds that are 4ft by 20ft long. Mine are slightly different because they use a bottom feeding system or soaker hoses. I live in Arizona and lack of ambient humidity makes dripper and other top feeding options obsolete.

  • squillyb7718 5 years ago

    I disagree with part of your statement, “plants with deeper roots? are healthier than plants with? shallow roots.” this is not true. I have been a hydroponic gardener for some time now and I use several methods. One of which is NFT, nutrient film technique. I use 4 inch wide rain gutters that are 10 ft long. They slope 10* from north end to the south end of the garden. The roots get a constant film of nutrients and water and the plan is suspended above. The roots are very long

  • miketonon 5 years ago

    @miketonon, what about FREE? cinder blocks with holes?

  • miketonon 5 years ago

    Pressure treated would probably be to toxic. non-pressure treated will rot. What about building? something our of used patio blocks or bricks.

  • ODFGERTERS 5 years ago

    Cedar has? arsenic in it, this is why it repels pests. That would be one of those nasty chems you didn’t want in your veggies.

  • temporaryfairymary 5 years ago

    Well you scientists should know why the organ plants don’t get rejected by the soil. This is similar to tissue gardening rejection in a SFG. This is a T-cell? mediated response. T helper cells activate the T cytotoxic cells and Natural Killer cells. The cytotoxic T cells chemicalsi produce that will destroy foreign cells. This whole tissue,organ rejection process is a cell mediated process!!!!!!! Also, macrophages engulf and destroy materila like normal.

  • AaronWindsor 5 years ago

    depending on the man made woods dont use them. Osb (chipboard) and mdf are made using urea fermeldehyde glues which are toxic to? humans

  • zekehooper 5 years ago

    Check out “growyourgreens” on you tube. I love his raised? beds.

  • J0hnnyH3mps33d 5 years ago

    What I’ve read is that you need equal parts, that is 1:1:1. I have only just? heard of this method, however, and have never done it myself.