Added by on 2013-04-03

[Total: 0    Average: 0/5] You must sign in to vote Installing and testing the electric slug control fence on a raised bed garden. Galvanized steel wire is stapled to the raised bed garden and connected to a 9-volt battery. This fence is an improvement over an earlier fence that used aluminum welding wire. The aluminum wire is fragile and usually lasts just one year. See this link for more details: www.instructables.com et test de la cl

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21 Comments

  • nlinventor 4 years ago

    Check with farm supply? places or hardware stores. Ask for galvanized wire. Also check the web for more info. Good luck!

  • christschool 4 years ago

    Thanks for the answer. I was thinking that perhaps copper would work because that is what is in our electric wires. Thanks for your advice.? I’m going to try this in the spring on my raised beds. Where did you buy the connecting wires from the battery? Is this something you just took from a discarded device?

  • nlinventor 4 years ago

    If you mean copper wire in place of the two? galvanized wires I can’t say for sure but copper does tend to turn blue (copper sulphate) and then I believe it is a poor electrical conductor. On the other hand, copper by itself (no battery) has been used to repel slugs but I don’t have a lot of confidence in it as a good alternative to the method shown in the video. Please see the link in my description (above) to get more details.

  • christschool 4 years ago

    I wonder if copper? wire would work even better?

  • nlinventor 4 years ago

    You? are welcome!

  • TheFrugal Gardener 4 years ago

    Thank you? for sharing this and keeping your idea free. We are SO going to install one of these on each of our Rain Gutter Grow Systems that we’ll be using next growing season. Slugs are a huge pain in our neck of the woods. This is just the ticket. Again, THANK YOU!

  • tamalhuasteco 4 years ago

    me too? jajaja

  • nlinventor 4 years ago

    Thanks? 🙂

  • ineedanaccountplz 4 years ago

    I jumped when? i heard the zap. The video editing was great.

  • nlinventor 4 years ago

    Maybe even less than 1 amp as you don’t want wires to heat up to a point where you could be burned should you unintentionally short the two wires with a? pruner or whatever.

  • fairyheli2 4 years ago

    only? temporarily to see what would happen. a 9v or 12v doorbell or light transformer might be a practical way however, no need to replace a battery. as long as the transformer is protected by a fuse and RCD (GFCI for Americans). given the incredibly low energy demand of this setup, a 1 amp fuse is probably adequate. we have Spanish tiger slugs here and they are massive.

  • nlinventor 4 years ago

    Hope you’re kidding? as that voltage could give you or others a significant and possibly dangerous (read – deadly) shock!

  • Alexander Declama 4 years ago

    What? about shorts when it rains?

  • fairyheli2 4 years ago

    I’m going to try this with 48v?

  • nlinventor 4 years ago

    Thanks Rearspoiler – yeah it was? fun to make, no need to be too serious with it all 🙂

  • Rearspoiler 4 years ago

    thanks for the informative and entertaining video… I can see you had fun making it too? 🙂

  • nlinventor 4 years ago

    Surprisingly slugs are not killed with the 9-volt source, so suicides are? not part of the action. Yeah, the sound effects are my way of making the rather long video more watchable. Thanks for comments!

  • Rearspoiler 4 years ago

    around 6:32, a smaller slug begins to detach itself from the wooden garden bed and abseil in the wind, protected only by a trail of its own slime. Aside from? the pavlovian reaction to metal wire, have you observed an increase in slug suicides since installing your electric fence?

    I kept watching this video for the sound effects!

  • nlinventor 4 years ago

    Kids sometimes touch the terminals of a 9 volt battery to their tongue to get a little jolt. The saliva enables? the battery terminals and tongue to make very good electrical contact that will cause enough current flow to give the shock. A similar effect takes place with the slug or snail – the on board slime being equivalent to the saliva. Non slimy things will have a higher electrical resistance and will not normally result in sufficient current flow to give a shock (at 9 volts that is).

  • FreidasGarden 4 years ago

    Just watched it again. So would I get shocked if I? touched the 2 wires?

  • FreidasGarden 4 years ago

    Very cool!? I wonder if it would work on earwigs and sow bugs? Thanks for sharing!